#CIPHRConf19 3rd/final blog

The closing keynote speech was by David D’Souza, covering the future of work and how we reshape ourselves as a profession.

He began by asking how we integrate technology into what we do. He established that we would all be happy if technology could automate what we do, but the challenge is that we don’t really know what we want technology to do, and we haven’t figured out what we do if it does automate what we do.

Another challenge is that we have short term thinking – we focus on short term rewards and less on long term progress.  We can see what technology can do for us today, this week, next week – but we can’t see clearly into the long term future as much as we would like.

We are also scared that rapid utilisation of technology will lead to massive unemployment and possibly Terminator style scenarios.

But in general we are not good at predicting things, so we are scared of stuff that is highly unlikely.  However our fears come from not knowing enough.

Technology gives us a massive opportunity to do things differently and to make organisations better. It gives us a chance to think about what kind of organisation we want to be.

He gave his oft rehearsed Jurassic Park analogy to illustrate this. “Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should” is the quote to remember here.

This means we should not copy other organisations who are successful, but focus on how we can become successful.

In the CIPD, he feels they are asking their membership to do three things.

  1. To be principles led.  Back to the Jurassic Park analogy.
  2. To be evidence based. Make your decisions really sound and based on robust, relevant and proportionate data.
  3. To be outcomes driven. Make a difference in lots of areas in organisations, and consider how best to use our time to maximum effect.

HR will grow and reshape as a result of this. He used a great locksmith analogy to get us to focus on people’s outcomes and not how long they take to do a job.

Too often in organisations, we focus on inputs, and not outcomes. In HR, we need to take half a step back, and look at how we can make work easier and deliver better outcomes.

Stop focusing on being busy.

There followed a Q&A which lasted almost as long as the speech, and allowed DDS to cover more general topics.

One pertinent topic was whether HR are equipped with the right skillset to use the technology – and he feels that outside work we have the skills and use them, but don’t always do that within the workplace, and this seems to be a UK specific problem in that our economy is too slow because we don’t use it well enough.

And that’s the end of the conference – this has been a great experience and one I’ve been pleased to cover via three blogs and dozens of tweets, and I’ve had access to some great learning and networking opportunities.

Till next time…

Gary

PS I’ve been out early every morning this week before others have been awake, and am looking very much to being at home tomorrow.

#cipdACE blog 3 – the new Profession Map

This afternoon has been one long conversation with almost everyone I know in the HR profession. I’ve managed to miss two conference sessions because I got wrapped up in some great conversations with awesome people.

I’ve also had a decent wander round the Exhibition and a chat to a few exhibitors. The quality of the Exhibition is better this year.

There are also various options for evening drinks which I need to choose from, and therefore almost everyone who wants to, can get some much needed winding down over a glass of wine or bottle of beer.

I’ve finished the day by going along to a Q&A session with David D’Souza and Victoria Winkler about the new CIPD Profession Map, labelled a special press briefing but it turned out only I was there and so there was little structure to it.

I’ve got a brochure about the new map and wanted to comment on a few things that jump out to me. It is of interest to me as I’ve contributed to this along its development path for the last two years, and a lot of what I do is linked to this map.

Here it is.

What do you think? I like it.

Why?

There is obviously lots that is new or refreshed so my views here are just commenting on the things that jump out to me, rather than a full blown review, so you will want to look at it in your own time and do that.

Here’s my two pennorth.

– A greater focus on culture and behaviour, business acumen, analytics, change and digital working in the Core Knowledge section. These are welcome from my perspective as I think not enough current HR practitioners display these elements and they can only help us to become more effective within organisations

– More emphasis on ethics, courage, inclusivity and passion within the Core Behaviours. Some of these overlap with existing behaviours but the fact they are more explicit in the new map reflects the changing world of work and the role played, or to be played, by HR in this. I’ll be interested to see how these make it into the new qualifications though but they’re definitely valuable.

– Within Specialist Knowledge, a section on the Employee Experience, a particular specialism of mine. More sections with an L&D/OD focus, reflecting my view that HR needs to have a greater emphasis on OD skill sets to help organisations improve, and a new section on People Analytics, reflecting the growing specialisms in these areas. All of these are welcomed too.

I’ve not spent a great deal of time studying this, and there’s clearly more work to do to roll this out and develop them fully, but the work to date has been positive and it’s good to see it at last.

There are more briefings on the CIPD stand, on Thursday at 11am, and a more formal launch is imminent.

What are your views on how this represents our profession?

And that’s the end of my day at the Conference although there are plenty of fringe events later. I’ll possibly see you at some of these.

Till next time…

Gary